GRI 400 Social

GRI 402: Labour/management relations

UNGC Principles
3Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining
SDG Goal
Decent Work and Economic Growth
GRI 103-1

Explanation of the material topic and its boundary

Good relations between management and employees are necessary to the operation of a sustainable and viable business. Employees should be respected, listened to and provided with adequate working conditions. Establishing genuine dialogue with freely chosen employee representatives enables employees and employers to better understand each other’s challenges and find ways to resolve them. We respect every employee’s right to freedom of association and collective bargaining and follow commonly recognised best practices with all of our employees globally.

GRI 103-2, 103-3

Management Approach

At Givaudan, we provide and promote an environment of open dialogue to ensure that all work-related aspects are well understood, openly discussed and that any challenges are properly resolved. We believe that genuine conversations improve mutual understanding and help us find resolutions to potential conflicts. We regularly consult with employee representatives, looking to inform and consult about changes in the organisation and to report any feedback to the Executive Committee (EC).

Communication is particularly important when employees are affected by operational changes and we respect legal local notice periods before implementing them.

Another element of constructive dialogue is our global Employee Engagement Survey, which offers all employees the opportunity to have their say. The survey is anonymous and conducted by an external agency, providing employees with assurance they can speak freely and that their voices will be heard. The impressive response rates show us that our employees feel empowered to speak up and create change. Results of the surveys are communicated to employees and local sites and countries are encouraged to take ownership of their results to build on their strengths and address opportunities. Global actions are reviewed by the EC.

Employee relations

Our global workforce operates in an international market and must be capable of adapting to a rapidly changing market. We try to cultivate an environment where the employer and the employee can better understand each other’s challenges and find ways of resolving them. This is done by establishing genuine dialogue with freely chosen employee representatives.

We strive for harmony in employee and management relations and follow commonly recognised best practices. We pride ourselves on our history of constructive dialogue with employee representatives and we support the freedom of individuals to join trade unions or other employee representative bodies.

Regular Union/Works Council consultations are held with a group of employees representing Union/Works Council members at all applicable sites around the world, including for all European Union member states where we operate. The purpose is to inform and consult employees about significant changes in the organisation, ensure that the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining is not put at risk, and to report any feedback to the EC so that they can take suitable action if required. The last European Works Council meeting was hosted by Givaudan at our Vernier, Switzerland site in September 2019.

In 2019, we were not notified of any violation of the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining at any of our locations worldwide.

 

 2019 Integrated Annual Report, Corporate citizenship, pages 63-65

 Our Sustainability Approach, pages 28, 50

GRI 402-1

Minimum notice periods regarding operational changes

We respect legal local notice periods prior to the implementation of changes that could affect our employees, either through direct communication to these employees or through their elected representatives, Union/Works Councils or other groups. In countries where there are collective agreements and where it is mandatory, minimum notice periods regarding operational changes are specified. These range from no notice to three months, depending on the country and based on local laws and practices.

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